Apr
23

Ibis Ascendant

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Glossy Ibis

Famously, the Glossy Ibis (here represented by the photo of a bird on Tobago last fall) is spreading like wildfire in Mediterranean France; our counts these past few days have fallen, conservatively, between 60 and 100 each day, a far cry from the times — not that long ago — when a single individual would make the list of an excursion’s “good birds.” By 2012, the breeding population of the Camargue exceeded 350 pairs, and the bird, dramatic and beautiful, no longer strikes anyone as especially noteworthy here in southern Provence.

Though this species was a rarity through much of the twentieth century, Crespon, a hundred seventy-five years ago, knew it as a regular spring migrant in the Camargue:

This charming bird only migrates through those of our marshy landscapes that are closest to the Mediterranean; in the early days of May, it arrives in more or less large flocks.

It’s tempting to think of those nineteenth-century passage birds as would-be pioneers, and equally tempting to find a hint at the reasons for their failure in Crespon’s words:

Their flesh is hard and leathery, and tastes extremely bad; it has an odor of sardines.

Nobody’s eating them today, and these exotic beauties are free now to continue their conquest of the world, one marsh and one rice paddy at a time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Screenshot 2014-01-22 19.33.38

The authors of this new book on bird names graciously confess (p. 15) that

it may not be strictly entomologically accurate.

Res ipsa ladybug.

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Apr
21

I Wonder

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White Stork on nest

Who brings the White Storks their babies?

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In between birds, Marco and I have been talking words.

Anybody surprised?

Yesterday evening, as we watched the sun set on thousands of Greater Flamingos and assorted waterfowl, Marco asked why the big, colorful ducks with the red bills feeding in the shallows were called “Shelducks.” My answer: I dunno.

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Our friends at the OED find the name “sheldrake” attested as early as the fourteenth century, an unsurprising date for so conspicuously colored and common a bird (and edible, too, though no doubt a bit fishy).

Not until the seventeenth century, though, does an explicit etymology appear. In 1678, John Ray in his Ornithology of Francis Willughby lists

The Sheldrake, or Borough-Duck… [so] called … from its being particoloured, Sheld signifying dappled or spotted with white.

Now I know.

Who can figure out the odd name “Borough-Duck”? Say it out loud if it isn’t immediately obvious….

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Apr
19

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I assure thee, Lucy, that coffee in France is certainly better than anywhere else.

- John James Audubon: September 4, 1828

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